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Monday, March 5, 2018

Gambling Disorders Among College Students

Fact: Seventy-five percent of college students gambled during the past year (legally or illegally) and about 18 percent gambling weekly or more frequently. 

Gambling is rampant on many college campuses and it can have a negative impact on student health. Lotteries, card games, pools (including raffles charitable small stakes gambling), sports betting and games of skill (e.g., bowling, basketball, pool, golf, backgammon, darts) are the most frequently chosen gambling activities by college students, according to the National Center for Responsible Gambling (NCRG). 

With “March Madness” or “April Suicide” around the corner, we thought it was a good time to take a look at some facts about gambling and gambling disorders to help you or someone you love make healthier decisions when it comes to betting. (Suicide rates and the use of suicide prevention hotlines rise in April and June over other months, at the conclusion of March Madness.)

Here are a few need-to-know facts from the NCRG:
  • Six percent of college students in the U.S. have a serious gambling problem that can result in psychological difficulties, unmanageable debt and failing grades.
  • Teenagers and college-aged adolescents are most vulnerable to gambling disorders because they are more impulsive. 
  • Male college students are more likely to have gambled in the past year; gambled with more money; and reported having gambling problems than female college students.
  • Students without gambling problems are more likely to use tobacco, drink heavily or binge drink, smoke marijuana or use other illegal drugs, drive under the influence and have a low GPA.
Addiction Help is Available
Not sure if betting for fun has turned into problem gambling? The National Council on Problem Gambling suggests being on the lookout for the following warning signs:
  • Preoccupation with betting
  • Lying about how much money has been bet
  • Feeling anxious or sleepless due to betting activity
  • Borrowing money to continue betting or to cover losses
  • Keeping it secret from family or friends

It’s important to seek help before any type of addictive behavior takes over your personal life, relational connections, and financial well-being. Contact us today so we can help or someone you love you on the road to recovery from a dual diagnosis. Call: 866-930-4673.
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