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Monday, August 13, 2018

4 Ways to Boost Your Recovery

In addition to following your treatment plan, there are several steps you can take to enhance your recovery and heal your mind, body and spirit. And, in fact, these activities can help you long after rehab as you work to succeed in school, life and sobriety. 
  • Add exercise to your every day: Making exercise part of your recovery plan is a great way to relieve stress, anxiety and other negative emotions common in recovery. Youll also boost your self-confidence and have a go-to activity to stay busy during those times when you need a healthy distraction. 
  • Make positive thinking a habit. Keeping negative thoughts – like anger, resentment or guilt – at bay is a challenge for many people in recovery. But a big part of staying sober is adopting a healthy mindset – and this means making an effort to think more positively (or to not indulge in negative thought patterns) about yourself and the world around you. 
  • Feed your body. Proper nutrition will give your body the key nutrients and vitamins needed to heal from the damage of substance abuse. By eating healthy, real foods, youll also have more energy and focus to complete recovery tasks. Remember to drink lots of water (to flush out those toxins) and aim for a well-rounded diet of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy and lean protein. 
  • Write out your feelings. Journaling is a cathartic way to begin or end your day. And theres no rules: Use the blank page to get out your feelings, write about your recovery experiences or track your progress. 
Giving Young Adults the Skills for Lifelong Recovery
Overcoming addiction is challenging, but it’s possible. At Hope Academy, our young adult addiction program will help you or someone you love manage life and school without the crutch of drugs and/or alcohol. To learn more about our addiction recovery services or verify your insurance, call today: 866-930-4673.

Monday, August 6, 2018

Common Issues for Freshman Year - And How to Deal

Freshman year of college can be both exciting and overwhelming at the same time. Here we take a look at some of the issues you might experience – along with tips on how to survive and thrive during your first year of school. 
  • Feelings of sadness and loneliness. These emotions are pretty normal and making time to get involved in sober campus activities and study groups and staying connected via social media with friends and family can help. If these feelings become more intense, however, and interfere with daily life, it’s best to seek help. Many experts say that college presents a so-called “perfect storm” for mental health issues, In fact, nearly 75 percent of all mental health conditions begin by age 24.
  • Lack of sleep. It’s not a secret that the majority of college students are sleep deprived – but sleep is vital to your academic and recovery success. Cut back on the caffeinated beverages, practice nighttime relaxation strategies and try to stick to a consistent sleep/wake schedule when possible. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of shut-eye each night. 
  • Weight gain. While you won’t necessarily pack on the “freshman 15,” weight management is a real issue for many freshman. Do your best to avoid processed, sugary foods, drink plenty of water, manage stress eating and schedule exercise into your daily routine.   
  • Time management. Balancing schoolwork and recovery can be overwhelming for even the most organized student. Do your best to manage your time and set realistic goals; consider investing in a daily planner and using the calendar app and “notebook” feature on your smartphone to set reminders for important deadlines or meetings. And, if you’re stressed out, take a break, stretch, go for a quick walk or call a friend. 
Finding Support at Hope Academy
Stressors inevitably arise as you begin working toward your academic and career goals. The professionals at Hope Academy sobriety college can teach you to manage these pressures without resorting to substance abuse. In addition to providing a therapeutic environment for recovery, college attendance, and career planning, Hope Academy offers one-on-one coaching opportunities for residents. Call 866-930-4673 now to learn more.




Monday, July 23, 2018

6 Ways to Support Your Loved One in Recovery

support loved one in recovery
The road to recovery is difficult for both the individual suffering from a substance use disorder and his or her loved ones. In fact, addiction is often called a family disease; family support is crucial for lasting sobriety. 

That said, it’s not always easy knowing what steps to take to show your support and help your loved one have a shot at a successful recovery. 

Here’s help: 
  • Educate yourself. Learning as much as you can about addiction will help prevent you from blaming your loved one and will help you better understand what your loved one will go through during treatment. 
  • Consider therapy. Both individual and family therapy can help you address your own emotions, including the challenges of loving someone struggling with addiction. Plus, participating in family therapy shows your loved one that you want to be involved in their recovery.
  • Seek support. Attending support groups for loved ones of addicts in recovery is an excellent way to combat any feeling of isolation you may be experiencing. Talking openly about your experiences and challenges with others who “get it” is the perfect remedy to prevent loneliness.
  • Practice self-care. The better you feel, the better you’ll be able to care for your loved one. Do your best to prioritize your own health and wellbeing. This means getting plenty of sleep, eating well, exercising and doing things you enjoy.
  • Prepare a relapse prevention plan. Family members also need a plan in case their loved one relapses. Family therapy is often a safe space to figure out what to do and how to respond if relapse occurs. 
  • Be patient. Recovery is a lifelong journey that requires patience (from you and your loved one) as you both navigate the ups and downs and highs and lows of sober life. 

Family Support at Hope Academy 
We know the importance of family involvement and healing in addiction recovery. That’s why we help the parents of our young adults heal themselves as they learn to better support their child. If your son or daughter has a substance abuse problem, act now. Call today: 866-930-4673.





Monday, July 16, 2018

Getting Organized for a Better College Recovery

getting organizedIt’s never too early to start getting organized for the upcoming school year – and to take steps to make organization part of your overall recovery and good-health plan. 

Staying organized can help eliminate stress and allow you to better stick to your schedule – both important for the academic year and lasting sobriety. Start with these tips: 
  • Make mornings count. Set your alarm a few minutes early so you can take time to write your to-dos, in order of importance. Make it a daily habit as you sip your morning coffee or tea. 
  • Slow down on Sundays. Before the chaos of the week, take time on Sunday to plan for the week ahead. You can pick out your clothes, plan snacks or meals, schedule in workouts, hobbies and study times – whatever you need to stay healthy and focused on your academics and your recovery. 
  • Invest in a planner/calendar. This handy and inexpensive tool will likely become your third arm. Take it everywhere and write down important assignments or goals or dates. 
  • Pack up your backpack. Make sure your backpack is stocked with the essentials. This includes your planner, notebooks, folder, textbooks, phone and laptop chargers, a healthful snack and bottle of water. 
  • Color code. To save time searching for things in the morning, use different colors to keep you more organized. For example, use a different color folder or notebook for each of your classes. 
  • Use your smartphone the smart way. Take advantage of the "notebook" feature for quick notes/reminders and the Calendar apps to remind you of important deadlines or meetings.  
  • Make post-it notes your friend. These small sticky notes have super powers when it comes to staying organized and reducing stress. Write down your to-do and stick it on your laptop or desk or bathroom mirror – and once the task is done, toss the note and forget about it. 
Healthy Possibilities at Hope Academy
When you choose Hope Academy's rehab, you open the possibility for a whole new life. And, perhaps the best part, you don’t have to leave college behind or put career preparation on hold. We offer vocational training, college prep, and sobriety college options that allow you to pursue your dreams while you get clean. To learn more, call today: 866-930-4673. 



Monday, July 9, 2018

Can Peer-Led Groups Stop Mental Health Stigma?

peer mental health group
Studies show that nearly a third of college students struggle with some kind of psychological stress and yet few are seeking help. So what’s the solution? Student-led mental health groups might be the answer, according to a new survey conducted by the RAND Corporation of more than 1,100 students at 12 California colleges with Active Minds, a nonprofit peer mental health organization.

A little background: The Active Minds model for mental health education and suicide prevention originated 15 years ago and uses a peer-to-peer approach to give students tools to undo stigma, change perceptions about mental health and create a more supportive campus environment. 

Here’s a summary of some of the survey findings: 
  • Students involved with Active Minds were more likely to reach out to a classmate or friend struggling with a mental health issue like depression, anxiety or suicidal thoughts.
  • As a result of an Active Minds presence, knowledge and positive attitudes about mental health increases, creating a more supportive campus climate and increasing the potential of students seeking mental health services.
  • Peer-led mental groups help to have a positive influence on students’ knowledge and attitudes toward mental health issues as well as their behaviors.
"Active Minds and other student-run organizations aimed at teaching peers about mental health issues may be instrumental in shaping a more supportive climate toward mental health issues on college campuses -- even over the course of a single academic year," Dr. Bradley D. Stein, a senior physician scientist at RAND and author of the study, said in a release. 

Sobriety College at Hope Academy
If you are or someone you love is a college student struggling with a co-occurring mental health disorder and substance use disorder, Hope Academy may be the ideal rehab program for you. Our peer-based program provides the safety and support you need to succeed in school and at sobriety. To learn more about our sobriety college, call today: 866-930-4673.

Monday, July 2, 2018

Tips for a Sober 4th of July

sober 4th of JulyThe Fourth of July can be a challenging and frustrating holiday during early recovery. But with the right steps it can also be the perfect holiday to celebrate your independence from the grips of addiction. Here are some ideas to enjoy your newfound sober freedom this July 4th
  • Make a grateful list. Jot down all the reasons why you’re grateful to be sober and free from drugs and/or alcohol. This simple exercise is a great way to start your July 4th celebration.
  • Go to a meeting. Surrounding yourself with supportive people who are also trying to stay sober on this day can help you stay strong and beat back any cravings. Not in the mood for a face-to-face meeting? Check out an online support group. 
  • Start your own tradition. A big part of recovery is redefining fun so it doesn’t include alcohol and/or drugs. Gather some friends for a round of bowling or afternoon movie – or whatever sober activity makes you feel good.
  • Throw a sober July 4th party. You can invite all your sober friends who are also looking for something fun to do sober. Put on some music, play board games, tie-dye t-shirts or bake cookies together. 
  • Recruit a support friend. Whether you're headed to a beach party or just hanging home with close friends, it’s super helpful to have one special person who you know is ready to help if the pressure of the holiday becomes overwhelming. Along these same lines, if you do attend an event with drugs or alcohol, make sure you have an emergency escape plan ready. 
Finding a New Sober Freedom
As you move from the bondage of addiction toward the freedom of healing, the Hope Academy team helps you manage life, school, and sobriety setbacks. To learn more about our young adult addiction services or to begin the rehab admission process, call today: 866-930-4673.




Monday, June 25, 2018

Gaming Disorder Recognized As Mental Health Condition

gaming addictionThe World Health Organization (WHO) is recognizing “gaming disorder” as a diagnosable condition. The organization included the new term in the 11th edition of its International Classification of Diseases (ICD), which was recently released. 

An estimated 160 million Americans play video games, according to the American Psychological Association, and studies show that the percentage of people that could qualify for the disorder is extremely small. However, people should be alert to the amount of time they spend on gaming activities, particularly if it impacts daily activities or leads to any changes in their physical, psychological health and/or social functioning, notes the WHO.

“The real issue is how is gaming affecting a person’s life,” Bruce Y. Lee, MD, associate professor of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, told EverydayHealth.com. “This can apply to nearly any habit or activity. If an activity is helping you and not really hurting anyone, then there’s not a real reason to consider it a disorder."

So what are the signs that you or someone you care about has a problem? The WHO defines  “gaming disorder” as a person who shows: 
  • A pattern of “impaired control over gaming” for at least 12 months. 
  • An “increasing priority given to gaming” to the extent that gaming “takes precedence over other interests and daily activities.”
  • A “continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences,” or behavior that results in “significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning.”  
Many experts are skeptical about the inclusion of gaming disorder in the ICD, however, and say that it’s a little premature. This is partly because people who play too many video games are often using gaming as a coping mechanism for depression or anxiety, Anthony Bean, a licensed psychologist and executive director at The Telos Project, told CNN.com. "When anxiety and depression is dealt with, the gaming goes down significantly," he said.

If you’re concerned that your loved one is going overboard with gaming, the first step is to “become informed as possible,” Bean told CNN.com. In other words, find out what games are being played (“Minecraft vs. “World of Warcraft”) and why the games are interesting to your loved one. This knowledge can be used to help them through depression and anxiety, he said.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment for Young Adults
At Hope Academy, we conduct a series of tests upon admission to determine if mental illness is complicating substance abuse. Once we gain a comprehensive understanding of each patient’s individual health challenges, our addiction treatment team develops a customized program. To learn more, call 866-930-4673.



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