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Monday, March 19, 2018

Study: Parental Approval Leads to More Drinking in College

college students drinking
"Parents who accept drinking as just a normal part of college may be encouraging their kids to drink more, according to a study published in the journal Addictive Behaviors.  

The researchers surveyed 687 Penn State students about their drinking habits and how much they believed their parents would approve of them drinking. The data was gathered at regular checkpoints across four years, from the last year of high school through the third year of college. 

To learn more about these patterns, the researchers arranged students into four groups, including students with parents who…
  • Consistently didn't approve of drinking
  • Consistently approved of high levels of drinking
  • Began approving of higher levels of drinking around age 21 parents
  • Began approving of higher levels of drinking when the students started college
The results: the more students believed their parents approved of them drinking, the more alcohol they tended to drink. Many parents didn't approve of drinking in high school, but when they went to college or got closer to turning 21, “the parents' attitudes relaxed and students' drinking increased,” said Brian Calhoun, graduate student in human development and family studies and first author of the paper.

The findings show that parents can still play a role in providing positive feedback and encouraging their children to make healthy lifestyle choices, especially during the college years when drug and alcohol use often peaks. "One part of this can be supporting safe choices about drinking alcohol,” said Jennifer Maggs, professor of human development and family studies, “and not reinforcing or making jokes about college being a crazy time when everyone takes risks without consequences." 

Conversation Goals During College
According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, it's important for parents to keep the lines of communication open through all four (or more) years of college. This regular communication will also make it easier to spot any sign of alcohol abuse, including: 
  • Binge drinking
  • Declining grades
  • Changes in appearance
  • Decrease in extracurricular college activities
  • Shifts in sleeping patterns
  • Mood swings
  • Reckless behavior
  • Changes in social circles or hanging out with others who abuse alcohol or drugs
Sobriety College at Hope Academy
If you are or someone you love is a college student struggling with a mental illness and a substance use disorder, Hope Academy may be the ideal rehab program for you. Our peer-based program provides the safety and support you need to succeed in school and at sobriety. To learn more about our sobriety college, call today: 866-930-4673.

Monday, March 12, 2018

College Students Learn to Use Narcan

More than a year ago, students at the University of Texas at Austin began learning to use naloxone, known by the brand name Narcan, which is used to rapidly reverses an opioid overdose. The goal: to save a friend or peer showing symptoms of an overdose. 

Program supporters compare Narcan availability to fire extinguishers or automated external defibrillators – both mainstays on college campuses. “The majority of the doses are likely going to go unused — that’s a good thing,” Lucas Hill, a UT-Austin pharmacy professor who directs a program called Operation Naloxone that UH students plan to expand into Houston this semester, told the Houston Chronicle. “Most fire extinguishers get tossed out without being used. This is similar.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2,588 people overdosed from drugs in Texas in 2015 and the figure rose to 2,831 in 2016. What’s more, four percent of Texas college students misused opioids in 2017, noted the Houston Chronicle. Still, noted Hill, it’s difficult to know how widespread the issue is on Texas campuses, as families often keep overdoses private.

Despite these rising figures, many Texas public universities lack written policies on naloxone distribution. “We felt as a medical organization that it was best for us to ensure that everyone who might encounter this within our facility be trained,” Martha Dannenbaum, who directs A&M’s student health services, told the Houston Chronicle. “Drug use, misuse and abuse exists everywhere. It’s not just the homeless population or the poor, it’s everyone from the highest administrative areas to young people that are functional.”

Do You Know the Signs of an Opioid Overdose?
Recognizing the symptoms of an opioid overdose and taking prompt action is critical to potentially saving a life. Although all of these signs might not be present, it’s best to seek medical assistance right away if you notice any of them: 
  • Unable to wake up or respond to your voice or touch
  • Very slow, irregular or stopped breathing
  • Center part of their eye is very small, often called “pinpoint pupils”
  • Fingernails and lips turning blue or purple
  • Slow heartbeat and/or low blood pressure
Opioid Addiction Treatment for Young Adults
Young adults (age 18 to 25) are the biggest abusers of prescription opioid pain relievers, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. And early intervention is the most successful treatment. If you or someone you love is struggling with opioid addiction, don’t wait to get help. Call today: 866-930-4673.

Monday, March 5, 2018

Gambling Disorders Among College Students

Fact: Seventy-five percent of college students gambled during the past year (legally or illegally) and about 18 percent gambling weekly or more frequently. 

Gambling is rampant on many college campuses and it can have a negative impact on student health. Lotteries, card games, pools (including raffles charitable small stakes gambling), sports betting and games of skill (e.g., bowling, basketball, pool, golf, backgammon, darts) are the most frequently chosen gambling activities by college students, according to the National Center for Responsible Gambling (NCRG). 

With “March Madness” or “April Suicide” around the corner, we thought it was a good time to take a look at some facts about gambling and gambling disorders to help you or someone you love make healthier decisions when it comes to betting. (Suicide rates and the use of suicide prevention hotlines rise in April and June over other months, at the conclusion of March Madness.)

Here are a few need-to-know facts from the NCRG:
  • Six percent of college students in the U.S. have a serious gambling problem that can result in psychological difficulties, unmanageable debt and failing grades.
  • Teenagers and college-aged adolescents are most vulnerable to gambling disorders because they are more impulsive. 
  • Male college students are more likely to have gambled in the past year; gambled with more money; and reported having gambling problems than female college students.
  • Students without gambling problems are more likely to use tobacco, drink heavily or binge drink, smoke marijuana or use other illegal drugs, drive under the influence and have a low GPA.
Addiction Help is Available
Not sure if betting for fun has turned into problem gambling? The National Council on Problem Gambling suggests being on the lookout for the following warning signs:
  • Preoccupation with betting
  • Lying about how much money has been bet
  • Feeling anxious or sleepless due to betting activity
  • Borrowing money to continue betting or to cover losses
  • Keeping it secret from family or friends

It’s important to seek help before any type of addictive behavior takes over your personal life, relational connections, and financial well-being. Contact us today so we can help or someone you love you on the road to recovery from a dual diagnosis. Call: 866-930-4673.

Monday, February 26, 2018

Spotting the Signs of Orthorexia

Today kicks off National Eating Disorders Awareness Week and so we thought it could be the perfect time to touch on a type of eating disorder on the rise amid today’s ever growing focus on “clean living.” It’s call orthorexia nervosa, defined as a “pathological obsession with proper nutrition,” and characterized by a restrictive diet and ritualized eating patterns. 

Unlike many other eating disorders, patients with orthorexia often flaunt their eating habits instead of hiding them, especially on Instagram, say experts. What’s more, the condition often overlaps with obsessive compulsive disorder and obsessive compulsive personality disorder.

While healthful eating is a crucial part of recovery, obsessing about what you eat can be a slippery slope. This is especially true if the underlying motivations for eating healthy include compulsion for complete control, escape from fears, improving self-esteem or searching for spirituality through food, notes the National Eating Disorders Association.  

Knowing the signs can help you or someone you love get help. Start by honestly answering these questions – and if you finding yourself feverishly nodding “yes,” be sure to reach out to a medical professional for help: 
  • Do you ever wish that you could eat without obsessing about food quality?
  • Do you ever wish you spent less time on food and more time living?
  • Do you have difficulty eating a meal prepared by someone else? 
  • Are you constantly looking to discover how certain foods are unhealthy for you? 
  • Does following a perfect diet take precedence over love, joy, play and creativity?
  • If you stray from your diet, do you experience feelings of guilt or self-loathing?
  • Does sticking to the “correct” diet make you feel more in control of your life? 
Lasting Health and Sobriety
Sobriety requires a lifetime commitment, but we’re here to help. To learn more about Hope Academy support groups, transitional living options, aftercare programs, and sobriety-college living, call today: 866-930-4673.

Monday, February 19, 2018

Parental Alcohol Abuse Linked to Child Deaths and Injuries

One in three deaths or serious injuries in children are caused by parental drinking, according to a new study published by the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology.

“Parental alcohol misuse scars kids for life and can lead many into a life of drinking too much themselves,” Liam Byrne, a member of parliament and chairman of the All-Party Group for Children of Alcoholics, told The Guardian. “Millions of parents drink too much and their misuse of alcohol causes horrific problems for their children.”

Researchers found that 15% of children had their bedtime routine interrupted by a parent’s drinking, and 18% were embarrassed by an intoxicated parent. 

There are 28.6 million children of alcoholics (COAs) in the United States and 6.6 million are under the age of 18. Previous studies have shows that children growing up in an alcoholic family experience difficulties as adults, too, including problems with: 
  • Alcohol or drug abuse
  • Interpersonal relationships
  • Anger management
  • Self-esteem
  • Trust
  • Depression
Modeling Good Behavior
Parents have a big influence on young people’s decisions about alcohol consumption — 80% of children feel that parents should have a say in whether they drink alcohol. What’s more, the way you handle alcohol around your kids can have a big influence on their relationship with alcohol. This is why it’s important to set a good example by drinking in moderation and never getting behind the wheel, for example. 

In addition, experts recommend reminding your child that underage drinking is against the law, and for good reason. Namely, adults are fully developed mentally and physically so they can handle drinking. Children’s minds and bodies are still growing, however, so alcohol can have a greater effect on their judgment and health. And, of course, if you think you have a problem with alcohol, getting help is the best way to become a positive role model for your child. 

Alcohol Treatment for Young Adults
At Hope Academy, we help parents advocate for their children, so they get the help they need before it is too late. To learn more, call today: 866-930-4673.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Mental Health Overlooked in College Transition

News headlines and social media feeds seem to be brimming with studies about how today’s teens are more stressed out and anxious than year’s past – and, yet, mental health is often left off of the college prep checklist, according to a new survey from WebMD, Medscape and JED.

According to the survey, “Preparing for College: The Mental Health Gap,” in the past five years, the majority of healthcare professionals noted a rise in mental health issues among teens: 
  • 86% said they have had more anxiety and stress.
  • 81% saw more anxiety disorders.
  • 70% reported seeing more mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder.
And parents echoed these findings, with 45 percent of those surveyed claiming that their teen had been diagnosed or treated for a mental health issue, learning disorder or substance abuse.

Yet here’s the surprising part: Only 28% of parents of teens with anxiety, stress or a mood disorder considered mental health services while choosing a school.

"If your child is already in therapy, don't assume it's going to go away once they start school,” Cora Collette Breuner, MD, a professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington, told WebMD. “Assume the opposite."

College presents what experts call a sort of “perfect storm” for mental health issues. For one, nearly 75 percent of all mental health conditions begin by age 24, and there’s also a significant amount of stress during this time. In other words, the college years are a critical time to understand and talk about mental health with your kid. Even if it doesn’t touch your child, he or she might deal with a roommate who is in emotional distress.

The survey stressed the need for all parents – not just those of kids with issues – to discuss mental health concerns. "It's going to touch your family's life, and certainly your child's life in one way or another," Stephanie Pinder-Amaker, PhD, director of the College Mental Health Program at McLean Hospital, told WebMD. "It does so much to decrease stigma and fear and anxiety just to talk about these issues."

Do You Need Dual-Diagnosis Treatment?
Co-occurring mental health conditions like depression may exist prior to substance abuse, or develop as a side effect of drug and alcohol dependency. At Hope Academy, we conduct a series of tests upon admission to determine if mental illness is complicating substance abuse. Once we gain a comprehensive understanding of each patient’s individual health challenges, our addiction treatment team develops a customized program. To learn more, call 866-930-4673.

Monday, February 5, 2018

Volunteering Helps Self-Esteem in Adolescents

If you want to feel better about yourself, you should start by helping someone else, according to a recent study. Researchers found that adolescents who perform acts of kindness (big and small) get a boost to their self-worth. And if you’re helping a stranger, the benefits can last up to a year later. The study, published in December in the Journal of Adolescence, surveyed nearly 700 adolescents.

"Surprisingly, teens who helped friends and family members did not report the same emotional change," said Dr. Laura Padilla-Walker, a psychology professor at Brigham Young University and one of the study's researcher, in a statement. "Helping a stranger is more challenging than assisting a friend, and when teens take this risk, they feel more competent.”

Volunteering and Your Recovery
We’ve talked about how volunteering can help your recovery in the past. To recap, volunteering is a great way to mitigate any negative feelings you may have about yourself and to gain the confidence you’ll need to deal with the ups and downs of sobriety. Here are a few more ways acts of altruism can help you stay sober: 
  • You’ll occupy your time. Especially in early recovery, healthy distractions can prevent you from daydreaming about using again.
  • You’ll build relationships: Volunteering is a great way to expand your social network with like-minded people with similar interests and goals.
  • You’ll improve your resume: Volunteering teaches you some essential job skills, including project management and sales. Plus, it’s great for networking.
Job Prep at Hope Academy
At Hope Academy, we provide practical, real-world guidance for clients who have completed college or are already pursuing a professional or vocational career. To learn more, call today: 866-930-4673.

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