Today is the First Day of
the Rest of Your Life

Get Started

Monday, June 18, 2018

4 Myths About Detox


detox mythsMaking the decision for yourself or a loved to enter a detox program is never easy, especially considering that denial is such a powerful side effect of addiction. What's more, many people suffering from a substance use disorder avoid recovery because they’re afraid of detox. This is partly because there are many myths out there surrounding detox, making it even harder to make the leap. Don’t let these misconceptions hold you back from taking this key step in recovery. Here, we debunk come common myths and offer you the facts about detox. 

Myth #1: I don’t need professional treatment — I can detox on my own. Detoxification is unsafe to attempt at home. It’s a demanding process with physical and emotional side effects that need to be managed by medical professionals. Using medical interventions, holistic therapies, meditation, nutrition, exercise and other techniques, trained medical professionals can help you manage withdrawal, cope with cravings and begin your rehab program with a positive outlook.

In the hands of the proper professionals, your custom detox program may include:
  • Medical intervention
  • Vitamin therapy and nutritional support 
  • Holistic practices 
  • Emotional support and guidance 
  • Peer support 
Myth #2: Everyone will know if you enroll in a detox program. Both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records regulations have been put in place to protect your privacy. 

Myth #3: Only wealthy people can afford good detox programs. Many rehabs are covered or partially covered by medical insurance and many detox facilities offer sliding scale payment plans for patients with limited financial resources.

Myth #4: After detox, you just need willpower to stay clean. Substance use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease and it can’t be controlled by sheer willpower. Detox is just the first step in a long journey toward recovery. You also need group and individual therapy, recreational therapy, nutrition and exercise, support groups, family therapy and aftercare planning.

Detox at Hope Academy
At Hope Academy, we encourage clients to think of detox as the beginning of restoration and a second chance at life. Proper detox methods help to kick off your rehabilitation program successfully, and can help you succeed in long-term recovery. To learn more about our detox program, call us today: 866-930-4673.




Monday, June 11, 2018

Moving Past Feelings of Hopelessness

hopelessnessAre you feeling hopeless? Is your head spinning with thoughts like “I’ll never be happy,” or “There’s no use in trying,” or “The world is against me?” Feelings of hopelessness should never be ignored. 

For one, these thoughts can cause you to isolate yourself and stop practicing basic self-care – which will just further add to your hopelessness and depression. And this can be a slippery slope into relapse. 

While there’s no magic switch to turn off these feelings, there are a few steps you can take to help restore your faith and boost your mood. If you try the below strategies and can’t seem to dig yourself out of a hopeless rut, or if you’re also experiencing suicidal thoughts or behaviors, get professional help immediately. 
  • Don’t isolate yourself. Surrounding yourself with even one good friend can help remind you that all is not lost. Talking about your feeling openly can also help you understand and even move past a few negative feelings.
  • Challenge those negative thoughts. The next time you find yourself thinking: “I can’t” or “there’s no use” stop and replace them with “I’ll try” and “I’m worth it.” This simple exercise can do wonders for your state of mind.  
  • Allow yourself to cry. Sometimes you just need a good cry – and that’s okay. Letting out these emotions can help release toxins and elevate your mood. 
  • Turn to your go-to comfort activity.  Whether reading a book or watching a movie or playing music – indulge in an activity that can keep you relaxed and distracted in a healthy way.
  • Get up and move. Exercise will help you release those feel-good endorphins that can help give you the added strength to move past any feelings of hopelessness.

Dual Diagnosis Treatment for Young Adults
At Hope Academy, we conduct a series of tests upon admission to determine if mental illness is complicating substance abuse. Once we gain a comprehensive understanding of each patient’s individual health challenges, our addiction treatment team develops a customized program. To learn more, call 866-930-4673. 




Monday, June 4, 2018

PTSD and College Challenges

PTSD Awareness Month
June is National PTSD Awareness Month, which is the perfect time to talk about how PTSD can happen to anyone – not just veterans. PTSD symptoms can develop from experiences involving natural disasters, serious accidents, life-threatening illnesses, physical abuse, and sexual assault during childhood or adulthood.

A study by the Eastern Colorado Healthcare System found that up to 17 percent of college students suffer from PTSD – which is higher than the incidence of PTSD found in the general population. It’s also not unusual for the symptoms of PTSD to fluctuate during the first year of college, as students adjust to new routines and new triggers.

In some cases, students with PTSD who have trouble adjusting to college life can turn to drugs and alcohol as an escape from anxiety, academic stress and relationship challenges. This is a slippery slope into addiction, with nearly 50 percent of individuals with lifetime PTSD also meeting the criteria for substance use disorder. 

College can bring extra challenges for someone with PTSD, including:
  • Crowded classrooms that can lead to feelings of being trapped.
  • Loud noises, like laughter, door slamming or screeching, which can set off triggers.
  • Lack of sleep, which can make it more difficult to handle triggers or upsetting moments.
  • Changes in routine that can leave a person with PTSD feeling discombobulated.
  • Feelings of isolation and depression caused by feeling “different” than others who don’t suffer PTSD.
This is why it’s crucial for students with PTSD to have a strong support system in place, including family, friends, pastors or therapists who can help when college life becomes too much to handle.

California Sober College for Veteran Drug & Alcohol Treatment
If you are a veteran or college student caught in the throes of substance abuse, Hope Academy could be the ideal rehab program for you. Blending evidence-based addiction recovery programs with the opportunity to attend college or vocational training, we help military veterans and civilians prepare for a life of sobriety and success. To learn more about our dual diagnosis treatment, call today: 866-930-4673.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Opioid Abuse on College Campuses

opioid abuseFirst, the bad news: The opioid crisis continues to ravage American communities, with rates of fatal overdoses nearly tripling from 2000 to 2015. 

Now, the good news: Only a small portion of college students are misusing opioids, with 7 to 12 percent of students reporting use for nonmedical reasons and 2 to 3 percent turning to heroin after prescription drugs, according to the American College Health Association (ACHA). 

In general, research has found that individuals with less education are more likely to develop an addiction to opioids. 

Still, college students are far from exempt from the epidemic and the devastating effects of these addictive drugs. In 2016, the ACHA released a set of guidelines to universities on prevention and treatment strategies for opioid misuse. 

ACHA advises college health centers to:
  • Avoid prescribing opioids when possible; NSAIDs and acetaminophen are effective for most pain.
  • If an opioid is necessary, prescribe for time-limited use only. 
  • Discuss the risks and dangers of these opioid medications, including the risk of addiction and overdose.
  • Consider close follow-up for confirmed discontinuation.
  • Screen for substance abuse, poorly-controlled depression, family history of substance abuse, concomitant use of benzodiazepines, and other major psychiatric disorders.
  • Add naloxone to the emergency box or cart.
  • Ensure adequate expertise and equipment to manage the airway of an unconscious patient.
  • Ensure adequate expertise and equipment to provide intravenous fluid support.
  • Plan and practice emergency response, including EMS system activation.

Since that time, many colleges have introduced opioid-related policies, including training sessions for students and employees on opioid use and the distribution of naloxone to campus police and health centers. 

Opioid Addiction Treatment for Young Adults
Early intervention is the best way to help opioid addiction from destroying the life of a young adult. If you or someone you love is struggling with opioid addiction, don’t wait to get help. Call us today: 866-930-4673.




Monday, May 21, 2018

Study: Smoking Pot Before Age 15 Ups Risk of Abuse

smoking potMore research confirms what addiction experts already know: Smoking pot is a big deal, and especially if you start at a young age. 

A new study by Université de Montréal researchers found that smoking marijuana at the start of your teens ups your risk of having a drug abuse problem by age 28 by a whopping 68 percent. The odds were reduced by 31 percent for each year of delayed onset of cannabis use in adolescence, noted the researchers.

While the frequency with which study participants consumed cannabis and other drugs played a role, those who started before age 15 were at higher risk regardless of consumption rates. And these rates may even be higher, considering that the potency of cannabis products increased over the last two decades, said researchers. 

What’s more, the study revealed that the earlier boys were involved in gangs, drank alcohol, got into fights, stole or vandalized property, the earlier they used cannabis and the higher their odds of having drug abuse issues by 28. Those who started drinking at 17 were also at an increased risk for an alcohol problem at 28.

These findings make it even more important to take steps to prevent or reduce cannabis use as early as possible, noted the researchers. "It may be important to implement these programs by the end of elementary school to prevent early onset of cannabis use," said UdM doctoral student Charlie Rioux, who conducted the study under the supervision of professors Natalie Castellanos-Ryan and Jean Séguin. "Since peer influence and delinquency were identified as early risk factors for earlier cannabis onset and adult drug abuse, targeting these risk factors in prevention programs may be important, especially since prevention strategies working on the motivators of substance use have been shown to be effective."

Sobriety College at Hope Academy
If you are or someone you love is a college student struggling with a a drug or alcohol use disorder, Hope Academy may be the ideal rehab program for you. Our peer-based program provides the safety and support you need to succeed in school and at sobriety. To learn more about our sobriety college, call today: 866-930-4673.


Monday, May 14, 2018

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Causes New Risk for College Students

fentanyl-laced cocaineThe synthetic drug fentanyl, which is 50 to 100 times more potent than opioids like morphine and heroin, is showing up in more street drugs and more headlines than ever before. This is partly because more Americans are dying due to these synthetic drugs than opioids, according to a recent report in the journal JAMA

And experts say college students who use cocaine to party and study may be particularly at risk.  Just like many prescription pill abusers turn to heroin for a cheaper high, many cash-strapped students have begun to trade in the study drug Adderall for easy-to-access cocaine – and they may be unknowingly getting fentanyl, too. 

Most college students have no idea where the drugs they share with friends come from or what’s really in them. Experts have said that fentanyl is being used as a cutting agent in almost every drug. “If you are using any substance, you don’t really know what you’re getting. Fentanyl can be mixed with it — and it can kill you,” health commissioner Dr. Mysheika W. Roberts, told WOSU public radio. 

Students who seek cocaine and end up with fentanyl-laced products are at an increased risk of the respiratory depressant effects of opioids because they have no tolerance. This can happen in mere minutes. And students don’t tote around Naloxone to reverse an overdose – and even if they did, they may not realize that since fentanyl is so powerful, the standard one to two doses of naloxone may not be enough. 

So what’s the solution? Of course, your safest bet is to seek support and treatment if you find yourself or your friend or roommate using and abusing drugs. 

Getting Help for Drug Abuse
For information about Hope Academy's young adult substance abuse treatment program, or to begin the admissions process for a loved one, call today: 866-930-4673.


Monday, May 7, 2018

Top Mental Health Challenges Among College Students


mental health challengesDid you know that one in four students are struggling with a diagnosable mental illness and yet 40 percent don’t seek help? Your mental health matters and if left untreated, could impact your academic, social and family life and lead to serious and even life-threatening health conditions. 

Luckily, more and more campuses are taking steps to help students take better care of their mental health – but you can play a pivotal role, too. 

Your first step is to learn and recognize the red flags. In honor Mental Health Month this month, here are some of the most common mental health issues among college students today. If you spot the signs in yourself or in someone you care about, don’t wait. Remember, you’re not alone and help is out there. 

Depression: According to one study, depression is the number-one reason students drop out of school. 
  • Changes in sleep habits  (sleeping more or difficulty sleeping)
  • Appetite changes (loss of appetite or overeating)
  • Sadness
  • Feelings of being overwhelmed
  • Hopelessness
  • Powerlessness
  • Trouble concentrating and paying attention
Anxiety: According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, nearly 75% of those affected by an anxiety disorder will experience their first episode before the age of 22. 
  • Feelings of stress and apprehension
  • Irritability
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Fearfulness
  • Sweating and dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Muscle pain and tension
  • Headaches
  • Frequent upset stomach or diarrhea
Suicide: Suicide is the second most common cause of death among college students, with someone between the ages of 15 and 24 dying every two hours and 12 minutes.
  • Difficulty handling schoolwork
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Changes in sleeping and/or eating habits 
  • Low energy levels or a feeling of being drained
  • Feelings of hopeless or being trapped
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Emotional outbursts (crying or being easily irritated) 
  • Changes in relationships, including sexual promiscuity
  • Self-destructive behavior (substance abuse, cutting)
Eating disorders: Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder are the most common eating disorders. Nearly 50% of individuals with an eating disorder are also abusing drugs and/or alcohol, which is a rate fives times greater than the general population. 
  • Skipping meals or making excuses for not eating
  • Excessive focus on healthy eating
  • Withdrawing from normal social activities
  • Persistent worry or complaining about being fat and talk of losing weight
  • Use of dietary supplements, laxatives or herbal products for weight loss
  • Excessive exercise
  • Leaving during meals to use the toilet
  • Eating much more food in a meal or snack than is considered normal
  • Expressingdisgust, shame or guilt about eating habits
  • Eating in secret
Dual Diagnosis Treatment for Young Adults
At Hope Academy, we conduct a series of tests upon admission to determine if mental illness is causing or complicating substance abuse. Once we gain a comprehensive understanding of each patient’s individual health challenges, our addiction treatment team develops a customized program. To learn more, call 866-930-4673. 


CignaAetnaBlueCross BlueShieldUnited HealthcareMore Options/Verify Benefits

Call us at to Learn About Open Enrollment

Request A Call Back